A REPORT On HOSPITAL GANGRENE, ERYSIPELAS And PYAEMIA, as Observed in the Departments of the Ohio and the Cumberland, with Cases Appended.; Published by Permission of the Surgeon General U.S.A. Goldsmith, iddleton. 1818 - 1887.
A REPORT On HOSPITAL GANGRENE, ERYSIPELAS And PYAEMIA, as Observed in the Departments of the Ohio and the Cumberland, with Cases Appended.; Published by Permission of the Surgeon General U.S.A.
A REPORT On HOSPITAL GANGRENE, ERYSIPELAS And PYAEMIA, as Observed in the Departments of the Ohio and the Cumberland, with Cases Appended.; Published by Permission of the Surgeon General U.S.A.

A REPORT On HOSPITAL GANGRENE, ERYSIPELAS And PYAEMIA, as Observed in the Departments of the Ohio and the Cumberland, with Cases Appended.; Published by Permission of the Surgeon General U.S.A.

Louisville: Bradley & Gilbert, Corner of Third and Green Streets, 1863. 1st Edition (Cordasco 60-0671; Garrison & Morton 12167). 94, [4] pp. Following text, a one page tabular statement of cases of Erysipelas, treated in General Hospital at Louisville KY. Tables interspersed within the text, including a large folding example giving the names of the patient, rank, company, regiment, when wounded, where, when gangrene began, tissues involved, region of wound, general & local treatments, when arrested, duration of gangrene, and with a list of remarks at bottom. 8vo. 9" x 5-7/8". Original publisher's brown cloth binding with title gilt stamped to front board. Cloth surface chipped some, notably along rear joint; tips show wear. Slight bow to boards. Small previous owner book number-ticket on front paste-down. Usual age-toning to paper. A VG copy. Item #49535

Gangrene is a type of tissue death caused by a lack of blood supply, which was a frequent, often fatal, ailment during the U.S. Civil War. ... In 2011, John M. Trombold wrote of Middleton: 'Middleton Goldsmith, a surgeon in the Union Army during the American Civil War, meticulously studied hospital gangrene and developed a revolutionary treatment regimen. The cumulative Civil War hospital gangrene mortality was 45%. Goldsmith's method, which he applied to over 330 cases, yielded a mortality under 3%.' Goldsmith advocated the use of debridement and topical and injected bromide solutions on infected wounds to reduce the incidence and virulence of 'poisoned miasma'. Copies of his book were issued to Union surgeons to encourage the use of his methods." [Wiki].

Price: $750.00

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