Item #51366 The COURT Of CHANCERY; Its Inherent Defects, as Exhibited in Its System of Procedure and of Fees with Suggestions for a Remedy.; Also an Appendix, Containing Extracts from Evidence Taken Before the Select Committee on Fees. . Dickens Challinor, Charles - Of similar mind, illiam. 1821 - 1896.

The COURT Of CHANCERY; Its Inherent Defects, as Exhibited in Its System of Procedure and of Fees with Suggestions for a Remedy.; Also an Appendix, Containing Extracts from Evidence Taken Before the Select Committee on Fees.

London: Stefens and Norton, 26, Bell Yard, 1849. Second Edition. 56, [2 (blank)] pp. 8vo. 8-1/2" x 5-3/8". Lacks original wrappers. Now housed in a clear archival mylar sleeve. Minor wear & soiling to outer leaves. Age-toning. Very Good. Item #51366

Any fan of Dickens’ works will immediately recognize the Court of Chancery as a key player in his impactful novel from the early 1850s, Bleak House, wherein the Court is pilloried in his recounting of the seemingly never-ending case, Jarndyce vs Jarndyce.

And Dickens' views foreshadowed by Challinor, who, in his opening paragraph of this 1849 publication, opines thusly on the Court: "The delay, expense, and practical injustice of the Court of Chancery ... I think it a duty to point out to the best of my power, and as fairly as I can, some of the inherent defects of this Court -- a Court which has for so many years, pressed like an incubus, on those, whose property has been unfortunately the subject of dispute." He then cites a case documenting his view of the Court.

Judicial reform finally came to the English Courts with the 1875 enactment of the Supreme Court of Judicature Act, which brought the various courts under one roof, so to speak.

Price: $225.00